If you listen to Barbie: “Anything is possible.”

Allison Rossi, Staff Writer

Over the years Barbie has been idolized by females at all ages.

For younger girls she is the perfect toy that they can relate to and do her hair and dress them in all different outfits. Older girls, on the other hand, are getting compared to her model body type every day.

Barbie has long since set an unrealistic expectation for women’s bodies, the need to have perfect hair, skin and attention from men.

According to www.barbiemedia.com, “Barbie’s debut as the ‘teenage fashion model’ mirrored the sophisticated glamour of 1950s stars like Marilyn Monroe, Rita Hayworth and Elizabeth Taylor, donning high arched brows, pursed red lips, a sassy pony tail with curly bangs and a coy, sideways glance. Even her figure was high fashion and model like, with pale, ivory skin, long slim legs and a narrow waist and hips.”

Barbie was a figure that many wished to be. Barbie had many careers in her lifetime, ranging from a volunteer to president, but Barbie’s career choices were not what many people focused on. That is, until the new Mattel commercial premiered.

The commercial is titled “Anything is Possible.” The commercial starts out by stating, “What happens when girls are free to imagine? They can be anything!”

The commercial goes on to show young girls ranging from approximately 5 to 10 years old taking on roles in high statues such as a professor at a university, a veterinarian, a soccer coach and a business woman.

The commercial is very comical and positive.

The commercial continues to state, “When a girl plays with a Barbie she imagines everything she can become.” The closing statement of the commercial is, “You can be anything.”

Sophomore Theresa Couchara had an opinion about the new commercial “Anything is Possible.” Couchara explained: “I liked the commercial a lot. I thought it was cute and powerful. Instead of showing little girls that they need to be perfect, this showed them that they can be anything they want to be.”

Wilkes University student Serina Steinbrenner also expressed her opinion on the commercial.

“I think it is important for a big brand like Barbie to focus more on girls growing up with big dreams rather than their physical appearance.”

Mattel does a great job emphasizing the importance of enhancing self-esteem and installing the idea to dream big in young children at an early age. The video sends powerful messages to people to inspire to be something important and that an individual can amount to anything if they set their minds to it.

This pushes the idolization off of materialistic items and physical features such as Barbie’s car, big dream house and  her perfectly slim figure.

The video represents what is truly valuable in life, to have a career of your liking and to not base your self-worth on your physical features and temporary items.